SURGERY & HOSPITALIZATION

Proper nutrition before and after surgery can make a difference in preparing for and recovering from procedures and hospitalization, and in helping adults get back to their best lives.

NUTRITION CARE

Wound Healing Support Through Nutrition

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Each person  is unique, so it makes sense that the wound healing rate would vary from one person to another. But for nutritionally at-risk individuals, especially those with underlying health issues such as cancer, diabetes and other chronic conditions, the wound healing process after injuries and surgeries may not proceed as expected.  

If this sounds like you, don't panic. “With the right nutrition, you can support your recovery and overall healing process”, says Jeff Nelson, associate research fellow at Abbott. We sat down with him to discuss some health conditions that can affect wound healing and why nutrition should be part of your care plan. 

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Recovering from Surgery: Nutrition for Surgical Wound Healing

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We're all different. But we're all made up of 99.9% of the same DNA, meaning our bodies aren't so different after all. In fact, we need many of the same elements to function. This is especially true with nutrition for wound healing.

Poor nutrition is just one factor that can delay wound healing. Age, as well as health conditions, such as diabetes or cancer, malnutrition, and cardiovascular issues can further impact healing. Soft-tissue infections and medications can also contribute to delayed wound healing. 

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Recovering from Surgery: Nutrition for Surgical Wound Healing

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Whether it's a knee or hip replacement, tumor removal or anything in between, one process always happens once the surgery is complete: a doctor cleans and closes the incisions they've made. Once that incision is made, your body’s healing process starts.

Our bodies are designed to heal any skin and tissue damage that comes our way, if we have the right tools to make it happen. To ensure that your incision heals properly, you'll want to take a closer look not only at appropriate cleaning and care, but also your nutrition. 

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Nutrition for Surgery Prep | Abbott Nutrition

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In the U.S., the number of surgical procedures is increasing, with more than 30 million performed annually according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. No matter what kind of surgery you may be having, preparing for one can raise a lot of questions and concerns.

One of the most often asked questions is — to eat or not to eat? There was a long-held belief that patients should fast before surgery. Luckily, complete fasting before surgery may not always be a requirement. Today, scientific evidence and surgical guidelines recognize the benefits of perioperative nutrition. In fact, preparing for surgery is much like training for a marathon, taking a major physical and mental toll. That's why many believe that it's crucial to prepare by giving your body the strength and energy it needs to handle the stress of the operation and recovery. 

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Nutrition for Surgery Recovery | Abbott Nutrition

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Each year in the U.S., there are 35 million hospital stays, with an average length of stay of 4.6 days. Whether from a planned surgery to an unplanned sickness, recovering after a hospital visit can feel like it takes longer to feel like ourselves. The good news is that with the right strategies you can support a strong recovery.

Here are expert answers to four common questions that will help you do just that. 

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Eating Before and After Surgery | Abbott Nutrition

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If you are about to undergo a surgery, such as a knee or hip replacement, running a marathon is likely the last thing on your mind. But having a major operation has a lot in common with running a marathon.

During both, your body requires a lot of energy due to the significant amount of stress it is put under. The stress that happens during surgery can lead to weight and muscle loss, inflammation, poor wound healing and complications like infections. Yet, more and more research shows that having certain nutrition in the weeks and days before and after surgery can help reduce these risks for a swifter recovery.

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NUTRITION IS THE FOUNDATION FOR LIVING YOUR BEST LIFE. THAT’S WHY WE WORK HARD TO ADVANCE AND SHARE THE LATEST SCIENCE AND CREATE BETTER WAYS TO NOURISH YOUR BODY AT EVERY STAGE OF LIFE.

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