EXPERT VIEWS

Abbott nutrition experts share the latest science, research, and real-world insights to improve nutrition around the world.

NEWS & RESEARCH

Tips for Wound Healing Following Surgery

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By: Dr. Jeanine Downie, a board-certified dermatologist and dermatologic surgeon at Image Dermatology® in Montclair, New Jersey

More than 17 million surgeries occur in the U.S. each year, from minor procedures like laparoscopic repairs to major operations and orthopedic replacement surgeries – all resulting in surgical incision wounds. As a dermatologist and dermatologic surgeon, I’m always advising my patients on how they can optimize the wound healing process after a procedure to reduce the risk of infection and other complications. 

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Evolution of HMB: From Sports Nutrition to Healthy Ageing

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By: Suzette Pereira, PhD., Senior Associate Research Fellow at Abbott

As new ingredients are added to nutritional products, consumers may marvel at their perceived novelty. However, many have been around for years but have only recently been utilized in specialized nutritional products. HMB, or beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate, is one such ingredient now emerging in everyday nutrition. HMB has been well-known in the sports nutrition market for decades and used by professional athletes, but it wasn’t until researchers started studying its effects in older adults that it became more mainstream. 

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Physical activity and good nutrition important for vaccine response

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By Mary Beth Arensberg, PhD, RDN, LDN, FAND

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Abbott Scientists Inducted into AIMBE College of Fellows | Abbott Nutrition

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Albert Einstein once said, “The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existence.” Two of Abbott’s top medical nutrition researchers have spent their careers questioning, and because of that innate curiosity, they have made major contributions to their field –creating widespread impact on the scientific community and in the field of medical nutrition.

The American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) announced the induction of two of Abbott’s lead nutrition researchers, Rachael H. Buck, Ph.D., and Ricardo Rueda-Cabrera, MD, Ph.D. to its College of Fellows.

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Using Nutrition to Solve Health Disparities | Abbott Nutrition

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The first wealth is health. It’s a sage observation from writer Ralph Waldo Emerson that still rings true today.

Yet, despite stunning breakthroughs in research, healthcare, and technology, we still face challenges in helping people live healthier.

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The STEM Women Scientists at Abbott

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More than ever, women are pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), and at Abbott, they are conducting groundbreaking research, pioneering innovations, making discoveries, developing breakthrough technologies, bringing products to market and changing lives. Not only that, they're changing the healthcare industry.

In honor of the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, we connected with two Abbott scientists, Barb Marriage, Ph.D., RD, who has conducted extensive global research in pediatric nutrition contributing to the development of nutrition therapies that help children with metabolic disorders get the nutrition they need; as well as Bridget Barrett-Reis, Ph.D., RD, who's vision, insight and direction have led to clinical trials and the introduction of innovative nutritional products for the NICU.

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Understanding Taste Preferences for Science-Based Nutrition

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By Dan Schmitz, global director of Product Development and User Experience at Abbott

There's more to flavor than what happens in your taste buds. It's a dynamic experience that draws on smell, sight, touch—and even your expectations, cultural upbringing and past experiences.

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The Science Behind Feeding Premature Babies

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By: Bridget Barrett-Reis, Ph.D., RDN, a researcher with Abbott who specializes in neonatal nutrition science.

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10 Surprising Factors That Affect Your Taste Perception

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Think about the last thing you ate. Was it salty or sweet, spicy or bitter? Did it taste the way you expected, or did its flavor or texture catch you off guard?

Our taste perception — whether we deem a flavor delicious or wrinkle our faces in disgust — is a product of who we are. That means our genetics, cultural backgrounds, where we grew up, and even where we live now can influence how we feel about the things we eat every day. 

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Using BMI and Muscle Mass To Determine Overall Health

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For over 200 years, medical professionals have used body mass index (BMI) as a tool to determine the overall health status of an individual. Using a simple equation of weight to height, people can be classified as underweight, healthy weight, overweight or obese.

However, research suggests that this single measurement may not be the best indicator of health on its own. How do we measure what's healthy? That's just one of the questions that health care, academic, media and other experts addressed in an event hosted by The Atlantic and Abbott. As it turns out, there may not be an easy answer.

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NUTRITION IS THE FOUNDATION FOR LIVING YOUR BEST LIFE. THAT’S WHY WE WORK HARD TO ADVANCE AND SHARE THE LATEST SCIENCE AND CREATE BETTER WAYS TO NOURISH YOUR BODY AT EVERY STAGE OF LIFE.

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