PREGNANCY & CHILDHOOD

The Signs of Protein Deficiency in Kids

Protein Deficiency in Kids | Abbott Nutrition

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Not eating the right amount of protein can affect your child's development, but how can you tell if they're getting enough? 

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AUG. 06, 2018    2 MIN. READ
Description

Believe it or not, one in seven school-aged kids in the U.S. don't get enough protein daily.1  That number is not too shocking when you learn that 30 percent of their total daily calories come from low-nutrient snacks, desserts and candy.2

If your child is not getting enough protein, it can lead to more serious side effects down the road. As a matter of fact, this essential macronutrient is so important for kids that it affects every single part of the body.

Protein provides important essential amino acids that contribute to the mental and physical health of your child. Without enough protein in their diet, your kid may experience the symptoms below in the chart: fatigue, lack of concentration, slowed growth, lowered immunity and more.

So how can you make sure your child is getting enough protein?

First, get familiar with the minimum daily protein recommendations for your child's age and also be aware of the signs and symptoms below. Then, look for easy, delicious ways to provide protein for kids throughout the day – like these fun, protein-inspired snacks.

If you aren't sure where to start you can talk to your pediatrician, a registered dietitian for advice or call Abbott's Feeding Expert line for general nutrition guidance.

Signs of Protein Deficiency

References:

1. Data on File, April 2018. Abbott Nutrition. NHANES data analysis. 1 in 7 school-aged kids defined as 6-13 years. National Academies of Science's RDA for protein ranges from 13-34g daily in children.

2. Generating Targetable Strategies for Improving Malnutrition Status among 2-5 Year Olds. Archdeacon AL, et al. Presented at 2018 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting, Toronto, Canada.

How Protein Fuels Development

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From infancy through adolescence, kids need protein to support rapid growth, development and immune health. Yet, research shows that many kids' protein needs go unmet. In fact, as many as one in seven school-aged children in the U.S. fall short of their recommended daily protein targets.1

Here's how to tell if your child is getting enough protein, how to easily add more to their diet, and why this nutrient is so essential for their physical growth and immune health. 

Protein Deficiency in Kids | Abbott Nutrition

Main Image

Alt text

Description

Believe it or not, one in seven school-aged kids in the U.S. don't get enough protein daily.1  That number is not too shocking when you learn that 30 percent of their total daily calories come from low-nutrient snacks, desserts and candy.2

If your child is not getting enough protein, it can lead to more serious side effects down the road. As a matter of fact, this essential macronutrient is so important for kids that it affects every single part of the body.

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